Gone Astray by Michelle Davies reviewed

Gone Astray Book Cover Gone Astray
Michelle Davies
Police
Macmillan
March 24, 2016
ebook
400
NetGalley

When a Lesley Kinnock buys a lottery ticket on a whim, it changes her life more than she could have imagined . . . Lesley and her husband Mack are the sudden winners of a £15 million EuroMillions jackpot. They move with their 15-year-old daughter Rosie to an exclusive gated estate in Buckinghamshire, leaving behind their ordinary lives - and friends - as they are catapulted into wealth beyond their wildest dreams. But it soon turns into their darkest nightmare when, one beautiful spring afternoon, Lesley returns to their house to find it empty: their daughter Rosie is gone. DC Maggie Neville is assigned to be Family Liaison Officer to Lesley and Mack, supporting them while quietly trying to investigate the family. And she has a crisis threatening her own life - a secret from the past that could shatter everything she's worked so hard to build.As Lesley and Maggie desperately try to find Rosie, their fates hurtle together on a collision course that threatens to end in tragedy . . . Money can't buy you happiness.The truth could hurt more than a lie.One moment really can change your life forever.

Gone Astray, by Michelle Davies, is about a couple who won the Euromillions lottery a little while ago and their daughter Rosie. When they won the lottery they moved to a large and expensive house, away from, but not far away from, their previous home. Lesley, Rosie’s mother, comes home one day to find her daughter missing and blood on the lawn. The book follows the story of the police investigation through the eyes of Maggie who acts as the Family Liaison Officer (although she is a detective too). Some chapters are from the eyes of someone who appears to be the perpetrator of the abduction if that is what it is.

The pace of this book was good and kept me engaged in what is, in many ways, a routine police investigation story. I found the characters less good and some of them seemed stereotypical and lacking depth. Maggie as a character worked the best for me. She has a personal story here too which came over well to me. It seems that this may be the first in a series of books featuring her and that has promise. All in all the story moves along well and I was interested. However I cannot say I was gripped by this and I did think it was somewhat clichéd at times. I would be happy to read another book by Michelle Davies and find out how Maggie’s story develops.  Others will enjoy this and it probably deserves 3.5/5 stars.

Note – I received an advance digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair review